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How to clean a mirror?

How to clean a mirror?

It is very easy for mirrors to accumulate gunk, dust, and grime. 

Particularly in bathrooms, mirrors tend to accumulate an unsightly layer of toothpaste, hairspray, or other bathroom products. 

Having hard water can make this worse since calcium and lime build up. Using the right tools for the job, isolating difficult deposits, pre-treating trouble spots, and isolating difficult deposits will make your mirror sparkling clean in no time.

1. Pre-treating stains to make them easier to remove. 

Examine your mirror. Mirrors may accumulate special types of grime depending on where they’ve been kept and how they’ve been used. 

Limescale and calcium deposits are likely culprits, and should be pretreated before working on lesser stains. Here are some strategies:

  • Calcium deposits are characterized by their white, slightly rough texture. You can remove these deposits by wiping them with a damp cloth soaked in white vinegar.
  • The milky white deposits on your mirror are limescale, which is difficult to remove. Lime juice, lemon juice, and pickling vinegar can be used to clean these stains.

2. Assemble the cleaning materials you will need.

By using regular paper towels or rags, you may leave lint behind on your mirror or cause scratches over time. Microfiber cloths are a simple way to remove lint. Make sure you also have:

  • Buckets
  • Two cotton cleaning rags
  • The water
  • Alcohol rubbing
  • White vinegar/ Bleach

3. Pour your mirror cleaner into a bowl. 

Pre-made window cleaners are also widely available at most stores, but white vinegar is a safe and inexpensive cleaning agent that will easily cut through buildup on your mirror. Simply follow these instructions:

  • You will need one cup of diluted white vinegar per four cups of water in your bucket. Therefore, for every four cups of water you use, you will need one cup of diluted vinegar.
  • You can also use a spray bottle found in the home goods section of most stores to spray your mirrors with the cleaning solution.
  • If you have hard water, use distilled water instead of tap water to prevent mineral deposits on your mirror.

4. Rubbing alcohol should be used to treat thick build-up and trouble spots.

Clean cotton rags should be soaked with rubbing alcohol and isolated, then trouble spots should be removed one at a time. This task should be completed as quickly as possible since rubbing alcohol evaporates rapidly.

The Best Way to Clean a Mirror is with a Microfiber Cloth

Glass cannot be cleaned with paper towels or newspapers, contrary to popular belief. 

If you are using a paper with soy ink rather than petroleum-based ink, you may want to watch out for lint, dust, or even newsprint residue. 

Instead of paper towels to wipe up spills, keep a few microfiber cloths in your cleaning closet – they’re the best way to remove stubborn streaks. 

Microfiber cloths with flat weaves work better than their thicker terrycloth cousins because they will not collect lint or other particles that could accumulate on the mirror and cause streaks.

Keep your time valuable by not wasting it. Remove as little lint as possible instead of trying to remove all of it. 

Ensure the job is done correctly the first time by choosing the right materials and methods.

Tips for Preventing Foggy Bathroom Mirrors

When cleaning your bathroom mirror, the tips above will certainly work, but for preventing your mirror from fogging up after taking a shower, follow our procedure below:

  1. Add one cup of water, one cup of vinegar, and one teaspoon dish soap to a spray bottle. Gently shake to combine.
  2. Let it sit for a few seconds and then apply the solution directly to the mirror.
  3. With a microfiber cloth or a paper towel, wipe away the spray on the mirror.
  4. The glass won’t fog up for a few days, so you can enjoy it. Repeat as needed.

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